New Year’s Resolutions for Hub Designs Blog

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Courtesy of Sally M.

Courtesy of Sally M.

Although 2008 was a tough year for many people, it was a great year for this blog. 

We wrote some well-received articles, and learned a lot about Master Data Management, Data Governance, blogging and social networking. We had almost 13,000 page views for the year, growing more than 20% per month.

In 2009, I’d really like to keep improving this blog. But to do that, I need your help.

Here are the top three New Year’s resolutions for the Hub Designs blog.  If you think there’s something I should add, please let me know by commenting here.

(1) More and Better Posts! Content is king for a blog. I’ve gotten a lot of great feedback, and the blog has surely gotten better over the past year, but there’s plenty of room to improve. We can share our perspective on MDM news and announcements, provide more “MDM 101” articles on core components of MDM technology, and share more insight on the “people” and “process” aspects of Master Data Management and Data Governance.

(2) More interaction with the MDM community — We’ve got the Hub Designs web site (which you can join using Google Friend Connect), this blog, our monthly newsletter, our articles & presentations, and we participate regularly on Twitter.  We recently started an MDM Jobs Board and an online MDM Community. We also maintain a Twitter Group and a Squidoo Lens on MDM, and we try to be active in the relevant LinkedIn Groups.

But there’s more I could do. Two ideas I had recently were an “MDM People” section, where individuals looking for new positions could list themselves for free, and “office hours”, where I’d make myself available for 1-2 hours per week to answer questions on MDM and Data Governance (I’d probably use the MDM Community’s online chat function for that).

(3) More thought leadership — I spend a considerable amount of time staying current on trends in MDM, and trying to “look around the corner” to envision changes and disruptions that may be coming in the next few years. In addition to sharing them with our consulting clients, we’ll try to include more of that here, so you’ll be able to stay on the cutting edge as well.

So that’s my starting point on what we can do to improve in 2009. What should do more of? Less of? What should we change? Please give us your thoughts by commenting!

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6 Comments on “New Year’s Resolutions for Hub Designs Blog”

  1. Greg Chadwick 01/04/2009 at 9:42 am #

    Hello Dan, great to see you hear

    My org has oracle 11i. They are making a step to fomalize/validate customer master/customer record creation

    Previously they used Tradestyles/DBA’s which has not worked for groups relying an valid legal entities

    They are looking for a customer naming convention document to use in 11i as a start.

    Do you have access to sample naming convention for 11i ?

    Thanks !

    Greg

  2. Dan Power 01/04/2009 at 11:44 am #

    Hi Greg,

    I found a pretty good document from Harvard University’s internal Oracle implementation at: http://able.harvard.edu/ar/qr/a1202q/

    Google the phrase “customer naming conventions” and you should find at least some good results. Here’s a few that I found very quickly:

    https://www.upk.ucalgary.ca/finmac/Customer%20Naming%20Conventions.pdf
    http://forums.rmaa.com.au/showthread.php?t=115

    Also, I’m a big fan of D&B, and their over-riding “naming convention” for company names is to use Legal Name, as provided by at least TWO independent sources (i.e. Secretary of State and at least 1 other source). So if you have access to D&B, that would be a big help.

    I’ve also posted your question on the MDM Community (http://mdmcommunity.ning.com), and I’ll let you know if we get any interesting answers there.

  3. GregC 01/07/2009 at 10:49 am #

    Hello Dan, that is a big help, thanks !

    I agree with you, D&B has done a great job providing correct legal name in addition to various DBA’s, tradestyles

    Does D&B subscribe to a (US) state’s ” Department of Incorporations ”
    when creating a BIR for the first time ? How do they subscribe or find
    ‘ name changes ” ?

    Regards

  4. Dylan Jones 01/07/2009 at 12:53 pm #

    Hi Dan

    Well, I gotta say, I think you could make a career as a Web2.0 guru if MDM dries up! You’ve covered every base possible and I’ve just registed for your MDM communit and already there are some useful discussions kicking off.

    I think for me keep up the great work you’re doing and keep giving us the real story on the ground, warts and all.

    This is an evolving marketplace with a lot of companies keen to test the water but very nervous about getting it wrong. So let’s hear from your clients and peers on some real tales from the coal face, no-one believes for an instant this stuff is a walk in the park so some honesty and reality against the tech. vendor case studies would be welcome.

    Putting my DQ head on I obviously want to learn more about how our members and readers can benefit from MDM as I’m sure many are keen to extend their skills in this area.

    Keep up the good work!

  5. Dan Power 01/07/2009 at 2:54 pm #

    Hi Greg,

    Yes, D&B does a pretty good job providing legal names and DBA’s / tradestyles.

    D&B does have agreements in place with all 50 U.S. states to get new business incorporations (although they require at least one more source to create a new DUNS Number for a new business).

    They have about 5,000 different data sources, and I think they look for name changes in all of them, particularly when a record is already tagged with a DUNS Number but now shows up with a new name.

    But I don’t think they do as good of a job on name changes, just because companies don’t always notify anyone, they just start doing business under their new name.

    Best regards — Dan

  6. Dan Power 01/07/2009 at 2:56 pm #

    Dylan,

    Thanks for the kind words! I really enjoy the Web 2.0 stuff, although I would hesitate to call myself a guru!

    I’ll do my best to provide the “real story on the ground” – it can get delicate, because none of the vendors really has their act together yet, and one customer’s meat is another customer’s poison.

    But I’m starting to feel more comfortable calling it like it is, and will do more of that in 2009!

    Best regards — Dan

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